The End of the World sung by Skeeter Davis

Under the Dome (serie televisiva) - Wikipedia
I am a great fan of sci-fi and every time I read great sci-fi or watch the genre, I stumble upon great music. While watching this on Netflix India, I got acquainted with Skeeter Davis. To give another example, it is Haruki Murakami who has taught me about Western classical music. 

Why does the sun go on shining
Why does the sea rush to shore
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world
‘Cause you don’t love me any more

Why do the birds go on singing
Why do the stars glow above
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world
It ended when I lost your love

I wake up in the morning and I wonder
Why everything’s the same as it was
I can’t understand, no, I can’t understand
How life goes on the way it does

Why does my heart go on beating
Why do these eyes of mine cry
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world
It ended when you said goodbye

Why does my heart go on beating
Why do these eyes of mine cry
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world
It ended when you said goodbye.
Writer/s: SYLVIA DEE, ARTHUR KENT

Listen to Davis’s heartbreaking song here if you are in India or use your Amazon Prime/Google Music Subscription to listen to her if you are not within India. 

Why indeed everything goes on when we are ruined? W. H.  Auden in his poem Musée des Beaux Arts wrote:

Image result for icarus falling painting
Bruegel’s Icarus Falling on which Auden constructed his secular theodicy.

About suffering they were never wrong,
The old Masters: how well they understood
Its human position: how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along…

Is there no hope? In the next blog post, I shall quote another singer and give the answer. Like Stephen King’s Under the Dome, Davis’ rendering of this song is theological. Both Davis and King ask the same question: why does evil exist? Why does one lose her beloved and none cares? Why does love always die in a hurry? And where is God to look over our lonely existence in a world which has lost all meaning for those of us who are destroyed by the “strange fits of passion” we have known? William Wordsworth in his poem whose title I just quoted is afraid that Lucy might die at any moment. But none other than Wordsworth will be affected. This is life, my reader. This is life. I quote Wordsworth  to show how love and death go hand in hand; love and the fear of losing the one whom we most love:

My horse moved on; hoof after hoof
He raised, and never stopped:
When down behind the cottage roof,
At once, the bright moon dropped.

What fond and wayward thoughts will slide
Into a Lover’s head!
‘O mercy!’ to myself I cried,
‘If Lucy should be dead!’

What we just now read above is known as the Problem of Evil. Why do we suffer? What is the cause, say, of poverty? The Problem of Evil is not a theological problem but a secular problem. When this Problem is sorted out in its entirety we would have annihilated evil. But this is not to be since it is a theological mystery.